Book Club – February 2021

For me, the absolute best place to read is a coffee shop.  It’s the perfect amount of background noise and the best ambiance.  Here are the two standouts that I read this month:
Long Bright River” by Liz Moore
 I loved this addictive procedural about two sisters navigating the opioid crisis from opposite sides.  I couldn’t put it down – it was unglamorous, but compelling and heart-wrenching.  
A Promised Land” by Barack Obama
I listened to the audio version of this book, which I can’t recommend enough.  I like that you can hear him wince when talking about his frustrations or hear the joy and satisfaction in his voice when he tells a corny joke.  It made me feel so nostalgic thinking about the 2008 election – which was a very exciting time in my life. 

See what else I’m reading on Goodreads

 

Book Club

Recently, I did something that has always felt very off-brand for me.  Since all branches of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh closed, my access to books has been seriously limited. So I ordered a Kindle.  Why did this take me so long?  The Kindle has been around for at least a decade and are relatively affordable.  I love it for so many reasons: books can be downloaded instantly, the backlight, font, and text size are adjustable, it’s light and comfortable to hold.   And the best part?  Library books can be downloaded for free using the Libby app.  I’ve also started using Libby to download audiobooks, which I love for fiction.  

Anyway, here are some of the best books I read this year: 

Trick Mirror by Jia Tolentino – Tolentino nails what it is like to be a millennial woman right now.  I read this book in one sitting. 

Uncanny Valley by Anna Wiener – this is a great peek into the world of tech start ups and hits very close to home for me

Medallion Status: True Stories from Secret Rooms by John Hodgman – I met Hodgman last year and got my copy of this book signed.  I also love his podcast, Judge John Hodgman 

Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls by David Sedaris – Sedaris is my favorite author; his books are like candy for my brain. 

At Home: A Short History of Private Life by Bill Bryson – I’m currently reading this book.  It’s basically history through the lens of the house, which is fascinating. 

%d bloggers like this: